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Saltypie

By Tim Tingle
Illustrated by Karen Clarkson

Hardcover: forthcoming

Paperback: forthcoming

Bee stings on the backside! That was just the beginning. Tim was about to enter a world of the past, with bullying boys, stones and Indian spirits of long ago. But they were real spirits, real stones, very real memories. . . .

In this powerful family saga, author Tim Tingle tells the story of his family's move from Oklahoma Choctaw country to Pasadena, TX. Spanning 50 years, Saltypie describes the problems encountered by his Choctaw grandmother--from her orphan days at an Indian boarding school to hardships encountered in her new home on the Gulf Coast.

Tingle says, "Stories of modern Indian families rarely grace the printed page. Long before I began writing, I knew this story must be told." Seen through the innocent eyes of a young boy, Saltypie is the story of one family's efforts to honor the past while struggling to gain a foothold in modern America.

About the Creators

Thumb_tim_tingle_photo__lisa_reed Tim Tingle - Author

Tim Tingle is an Oklahoma Choctaw and an award-winning author and storyteller of twenty books. In 1993, he retraced the Trail of Tears to Choctaw homelands in Mississippi and began recording stories of tribal elders. From talks with Archie Mingo emerged Crossing Bok Chitto, Tingle’s first illustrated children’s book. This history-based tale is the inspiration for Stone River Crossing. The plot is filled with elements of Choctaw culture, plus a colorful dash of Choctaw magic realism. Tingle lives in Texas.

Photo: Lisa Reed

Thumb_karen_clarkson Karen Clarkson

Karen Clarkson, Choctaw artist and tribal member, lives in San Leandro, California with her husband Bill and their two dogs. A trip to Paris when she was ten inspired her to study the old masters but she feels she came into her own as an artist when she started creating portraits of Native Americans. She first started learning about art by drawing pictures of all her relatives. In this way she felt as if she knew many of her ancestors even though she had never met them. Saltypie is her first book.